Tag Archives: cortland line

Tribalism and Angling – There’s No Room for It

Why can’t we hairless apes avoid the negative aspects of tribalism?  Acting superior without thought or basis, rushing to judge, haplessly tossing labels around, etc.  All that counterproductive, generally negative behavior even manifests in our recreational pursuits.  As a community of anglers, we need to consider how all this inter-tribal rivalry looks from the non-angling population.  Especially to those that are considering getting into fishing.  We owe it to ourselves to work with one another/try to understand one another in order to demonstrate the overall benefits of this primordial pursuit to would-be future anglers.  For the sake of the sport…for the sake of our environment.

What am I Talking About?

Where is all of this coming from?  I’m not going to waste my time providing examples tribalism within the angling community.  Every angler reading this knows exactly what I’m talking about.  There are what amounts to 3 large tribes in the angling community:

  1. Fly Anglers
  2. Conventional tackle (spinning, casting, trolling) anglers
  3. Center Pin anglers

Within these 3 general groupings, there are thousands of sub-tribes with their own rivalries and distinct languages.  Moreover, one could easily come up with a different, overall tribal grouping.  An example could be catch-and-release anglers and harvesters.  The names of the tribes and their associations don’t matter.  The community of anglers is rife with tribalism.  The argument that follows suits every level of inter- and intra- tribal behavior.

Seek Understanding

People get into fishing for many different reasons.  Some enjoy it right away or at a minimum, find it interesting enough to decide to pursue the passion of angling as a personal endeavor.  Maybe because their virgin angling experience involved great weather and a ton of fish.  Maybe because that first time on the water opened their eyes to how fishing helps relieve stress.  Whatever the reason, many people continue to fish for the rest of their life after that first time on the water.

Consider these budding anglers as a blank slate.  Someone, or a small group of people, will form and shape that individual’s growth.  Unfortunately, far too many beginning anglers start off with mentors that are deeply tribal, hell I’ll say it, radical and close minded in their beliefs.  Perhaps a little naively, these new anglers adopt the ideals and beefs of the tribe with little to no thought.

Why Does this Happen?

Newcomers to a community want aid, encouragement, and mentorship at most and ambivalence at least from the other members.  The act of associating with or considering oneself a part of a specific community/tribe implies a desire for some sort of acceptance.  A pride of belonging.  Such behavior is completely understandable.  However, I am imploring all newcomers to think and ask questions before giving yourself a label.

Regardless of one’s reasons for deciding to get into angling, everyone wants to enjoy it.  Tribal drama, both on and off the water, is an impediment to the enjoyment one should experience while fishing.  If one engages in tribal drama, one will miss out on what should be an enriching and enjoyable activity.

Try to Rise Above the Fray

You can avoid tribalism and fishing, or be a casual observer of the behavior, by becoming a generalist.  There is no “best” way to fish.  There are hundreds of methods with hundreds of their own variations.  All have advantages and disadvantages, and all have radical, tribal instigators.

Ignore anyone who claims, “it only counts if you catch a fish _____.”  I’ve seen that statement many times on Instagram.  Every time I do, I want to throw up.  ONLY COUNTS TOWARDS WHAT?!?!?  Here’s my message to anyone who uses a line like this:

Is your ego so frail that you have to make up some bullshit competition that only you can win because the other competitors don’t even know you’re playing a game?  OR are you just copying a hashtag someone you admire used and now you’re doing it because you think it makes you “cool?”

New anglers should also avoid anyone who claims superiority of method.  As I mentioned above – there is no best way to fish.  The word best is completely subjective.  What’s the definition of the word, “best?”  Does best mean most effective?  Most effective toward what end?  Catching the most fish?  Catching the biggest fish?  Providing the greatest amount of fulfillment?  Only the participant can answer that question and that question is best answered through exposure to a multitude of experiences.

There is a ton to learn in the pursuit of our quarry.  Why not exchange best practices instead of putting someone down who does things differently?  If you think this idea is too soft and sensitive, then just don’t engage.  If your ego is so frail that you really need to hype yourself up, please try doing it in a way that doesn’t claim superiority.  It’s easy – just set an exemplary example.

Where Does Brookdog Fishing Company Fall?

We started as generalists and remain generalists.  A hunger to continue learning and developing relationships with fishy people keeps us motivated.  We’re disgusted by tribal superiority complexes.  We’re disturbed by hapless judgements and the casting of labels.

We just want to fish and have a good time.  Sometimes we use fly tackle.  Other times we use spinning tackle.  We put casting gear to use.  We troll.  Every once in a blue moon we’ll bust out the Tenkara rods.  We’ve also been known to fish under floats.  It’s all fun.  It all works.  Sometimes one works better than the other.  Sometimes they all work the same.  Every time it’s a blast.

We don’t always, “keep ‘em wet” – we respect the hero shot for the memory of the experience it provides to our clients and friends.  Besides, sometimes we eat the fish we catch so when we plan on doing so, why would we “keep-em-wet?”  They are going right into the live well with severed gills moments after that photo and into the skillet a few hours after that.  Sometimes, we’re voyeurs of nature that help people trick our quarry into eating what’s on the end of the line in order to experience a fight and/or connect to something wild.

Stay Drama Free

Label us and others however you want.  It really doesn’t matter to us as we don’t pay too much attention to all the drama.  However, occasionally, we feel compelled to offer our angling colleagues a different way of thinking when we notice a negative trend.  So here is our take on tribalism and angling: avoid it…don’t align yourself with a tribe.  Just be a person who wants to fish and enjoy drama free days on the water.  Well…I guess that’s kind of a tribe of its own.

Winter Charter Fishing in Buffalo Niagara

No…I am not going to go on another rant about avoiding the shack nasties. Hopefully, you understand our perspective on how remaining cooped up all winter is a recipe for a slow, yet assured, descent into depression…or worse. I would like to dedicate some time to challenging a few paradigms about charter fishing in the winter. I’m writing this in order to inform locals about a few natural wonders that go on in their back yard ONLY in winter. It’s also my hope that non-locals will read this and find it so interesting that they feel compelled to visit. Here we go…

That Initial Shock

In our previous blog, we discussed reasons why winter fishing is not crazy.  In fact, we concluded that it’s completely sane. Here, I want to get to the root of why people seem to instinctually respond this way. Last week, a client remarked that he was surprised to see so many people fishing in the winter. The shoreline in Devils Hole and Art Park was lined with a strong number of anglers. The River was lined with numerous charter boats and recreational anglers.

To someone witnessing and participating in this for the first time, I can see why it seemed a little foreign. If I asked you to picture yourself skiing, even if you’ve never done it before, some image will likely pop into your mind.  I think the popularity and presence in popular media make this possible. The same might be the case if I asked you to picture tailgating at a Bills game.  Or ice fishing in a hut.

Winter sports and many other outdoor activities are popular in areas that experience freezing temperatures and snow.  This is why it’s understandable that people can conjure images of these activities. However, if I asked you to picture yourself floating down the canyon of a river in a comfortable boat while catching big, beautiful, trout, you might start twitching. Your reaction would be like Harland Williams in There’s Something About Mary.  You know – that scene when Ben Stiller shattered his and dreams during a discussion about the length of ab workout videos.

A Winter Fishing Charter is Completely Foreign…for Good Reason

I think the reason it’s so difficult to imagine something like this is because it’s only possible in a few places in the world. Think about this for a second.  How many places can you think of where a massive strait is moving water from one inland/freshwater ocean to another? That’s an immense amount of water to consider. I had clients from Maine here last winter who were blown away and slightly frightened by the size of the Niagara. When there is that much water moving around, even though it gets incredibly cold, it keeps on flowing.

Water that cold takes on a greenish hue that’s difficult to describe. After Lake Erie freezes, it’ll run gin clear nearly every day. Sometimes, one can see steelhead, lake trout, and walleyes peeling away from the boat in over 20 ft of water. It’s kind of surreal.

It Makes Sense if You’re Concerned – but Get Over It

Aside from how foreign floating down a near frozen river in cold temperatures seems to one’s imagination, there is a rational fear or kind of a cringe in response to the idea. “Why would anyone in their right mind expose themselves to water when it’s cold outside?” I get it – but consider this:

Don’t Concern Yourself with the Thought of “Getting Wet”

One rarely, if ever, gets wet on a winter charter trip. The occasional light spray may occur but nothing that has any noticeable adverse effect. In other words – getting wet isn’t an issue. Think about it – when was the last time you heard about someone fishing from a boat in the winter that got hypothermia? If your charter captain knows what he/she is doing, the thought of getting wet passes within minutes of boarding the vessel and driving upstream.

It’s Likely You Already Have the Right Gear to Do This

Even though your chances of getting wet (in an uncomfortable way – hell, your hands better get wet after holding the fish you catch) are low, one still needs to respect Mother Nature and dress accordingly. Often times, this is the biggest obstacle. Many people believe they don’t have the clothing that will allow them to go fishing in the winter.

What you are really saying is that you don’t have clothing that will allow you to spend a few hours outdoors in the winter. Because that’s all it takes for you to go on a charter trip in the winter. If you don’t have that kind of clothing, well, that’s kind of crazy. If you live where freezing temperatures and snow storms are likely and you don’t have clothing that’ll allow you to spend a few hours outside, you need to rethink your situation. Any outfit you’d wear for a long walk outside will work. Warm socks, boots, layers for top and bottom, and a shell or coat that’ll shield you from the wind.

You may be imagining yourself, fully exposed, getting pelted with snow. Clear that image out. Generally, unless we have particularly hearty clients, we won’t fish when the snow is really coming down. Visibility becomes an issue as does deck safety. This is just another way of me saying that you’re likely more prepared to go on a charter fishing trip in the winter.

Consider this as well – the high yesterday was in the mid-20s. The “normal” reaction to that temperature is to think, “It’s too damn cold to go outside.” BUT…it was sunny, and snow was melting everywhere. If you bothered to walk around outside for a bit, you likely noticed that it was comfortable, even with minimal layering. In other words, you should challenge yourself to think differently about what weather conditions are pleasant and which ones are not this time of year.

You’ll Be Rewarded for Taking the Chance

If you overcome the mental obstacles to getting out there and you make a little wardrobe adjustment, you can reap an immense reward.  You can experience catching large, beautiful trout, in spawning colors, in an incredibly beautiful setting. The upcoming cold-weather months are the only time of year you can see something like this.

From the perspective of most people who hire a charter captain for a trip, it’s just great to be out there, making memories with their friends. That’s the business my colleagues and I are in – creating an experience that will stay with you for a long time (we hope).

After all, winter is the season of the holidays. People tend to get together far more often and/or connect with family they haven’t seen in a long time. What are you going to do with your tribe? Sit around and watch TV? Eat some food? Go to a movie? Drink beer? Cool…I guess. For a couple days maybe. Even if that sounds incredible, break your days up a bit, get some fresh air, recharge the liver and fight some fish.

Consider a Winter Fishing Charter…That’s All We’re Asking

As residents of the region, we are aware that winter in Buffalo Niagara is rife with opportunities to have fun outdoors. If you already have a hobby/activity that eats up those few weekends where weather will allow you to get out there, you may not have time for a charter (although, we hope you can fit it in at some point).

If you don’t have a winter hobby but are considering getting into something instead of rotting indoors, I hope this article made you think about taking a charter fishing trip this winter. Let me rant really quick – I don’t care if you are hitting the gym daily throughout the winter, you’re still going to end up unhealthy if you don’t get outside – O.K., rant over.

I’m not going to bore you with numbers and statistics.  I would like to encourage you to compare taking a few charter fishing trips this winter to some other options to get outside. I’m confident you’ll find that winter charter trips are an extremely economical, convenient, and extraordinarily enriching option. We hope you’ll give us a call or do some research to challenge or confirm this idea.

Late Summer Fishing In Buffalo Niagara

It’s late summer people. Even I have to kick myself in the butt to shake the late summer lull. If you’re a resident of the great lakes region, you do everything you can to maximize your summer. Why do we behave this way you westerners and southerners may ask? Because our winters are harsh and some of us hibernate. The problem with this way of life is that many of us take it too hard during the first few months of summer. So hard that by now, mid-August, many of us are worn out. Shake off that late summer lull my friends. There’s still a few weeks of fun remaining.

A Recent Revelation

A couple days ago, I was tying leaders on my boat in my driveway when I felt something. It was something I haven’t experienced in quite some time – a chill. The breeze blew, clouds shrouded the sun, and I got a little chill down my spine. I experienced something similar yesterday when I was fishing with my daughter. It was warmer in the river than outside. Today – I wore a hoody during the morning commute to Lake Erie.

The morning and evening temperatures seem a bit cooler. Days are getting a bit shorter. It’s late summer alright. Do you feel it? Although many of us have had incredible summers thus far, a sense of urgency should be on the creep. There are only a few weeks left until the kids go back to school and schedules start getting a bit more complex. Now is the time to get a second (or third or fourth) wind and get the most out of this last month of summer.

These emotional peaks and valleys us great lakes folks experience define our culture in a way. We take pride in the fact that we can cram a ton of fun into a short period. We work hard and party harder. Delayed gratification is THE ONLY WAY to truly enjoy something. Having something to look forward to fuels our work ethic – I just gotta grind a bit more and then all will be well. Personally, I wouldn’t have it any other way. Still – there’s one month left before we really start seeing some change and I want to maximize every bit of it.

It’s Late Summer – Steelhead…Really!?!

It’s been happening more and more lately. Although it’s late summer, social media has been simmering with TBTs and old pics of people gripping and grinning steelhead. There is a substantial faction of the angling community who are already thinking about the fall run. Unfortunately, these folks are missing out on some awesome, late summer angling, going on right now.

My friends, the stockers can wait. Don’t fret – the leaves will change, snow will fall, it’ll get cold, and steelhead will show up. They will also stay around for 7+months so you’ll be able to fill that emotional void and keep it full for quite some time. For now, get outside and enjoy our late summer action on the big water. Flip flops, a choice beverage, and a quick dip into the water to cool off every once in awhile. Don’t have a boat? Give us a call – we can help you out.

Observations from the Water

Smallmouth bass are starting to strap on the feedbags. Like us, they have been in a bit of a late summer lull but that’s changing. I’m guessing they sense that the days are getting shorter and that’s triggering them to pack on the pounds before the water gets cold and prey species become less available.

Higher water temperatures make them want to work a lot less for their food, so they are chowing down on easy meals around rocks and structure. Half-digested crawfish and gobys have been showing up on the deck of the boat – little donations from the stomachs of  boated smalljaws.

We’ve also been doing a lot of walleye fishing. This is a new game for us but were getting it dialed in. From talking to my colleagues, this has been a banner year. Although I don’t have a frame of reference, it’s been fantastic. They are such an excellent eating fish. So much so that I’m going on a walleye only diet for a week. I’ll get ripped – watch!

I also went out with Matt Yablonski of Wet Net Charters for my first summer king trip.  Those fish are incredibly strong – a different animal than the ones we’ll be catching in the lower river in about a month.

Plan for Next Week

Bookings are a bit light. That doesn’t matter though as we’ll be on the water anyway. Bass and walleye will continue to be the focus. The forecast looks excellent. Get out there and enjoy it while you still can. If you want to spend some of that time on the water – give us a call!

The Smalljaw Syndicate – Buffalo Niagara Represents

Buffalo Niagara – A Strong Stop on the Smalljaw Syndicate

A few years ago, Mike Schultz of Schultz Outfitters started an Instagram hashtag – #smalljawsyndicate. It was and continues to be a great branding and marketing tool that generates a strong appeal for smallmouth bass. Let’s face it – in the fly fishing world, for generations, trout have reigned supreme as the target game species for fly anglers. Although trout are a very appealing quarry for many reasons, the smalljaw syndicate is growing and beginning to challenge them in appeal.

The Native Angle

I am not a purist in any area of the angling community. I fish for every species with all tackle types and every method I can get my hands on – always trying to learn something new in order to accommodate all clients of all experience levels and to ensure they have a good time. However, I border on the purist space in one area – I prefer to pursue native species. Where we live, and this goes for just about every state bordering the great lakes, smallmouth bass, walleye, pike, and musky are the premier, native game fish.

Conventional tackle anglers in this region have pursued these fish for generations and often get religious about it. Fly anglers on the other hand, remain weirdly loyal to salmonids. Steelhead, lake run brown trout, and salmon draw massive crowds and a ton of money to the region but nearly all of these are stocked by the hundreds of thousands every year – none of them are native. Yet – they maintain a nearly religious following.

Steelhead, for example, have a huge and extremely loyal following in the great lakes region – Buffalo Niagara included. There are books and films that capture all of it in its glory. Fly anglers pine over steelhead season (which lasts 8 months out of the year) and become downtrodden when they leave the tribs. Don’t get me wrong, they are truly cool fish, a ton of fun to catch, and I happily guide clients for them but what’s the difference between fishing for them vs. fishing the stocked trout creeks on the opener? Size and fight? OK…

Enter the Smalljaw Syndicate

I’ll state this again – I didn’t come up with the term smalljaw syndicate. Mike Schultz did and got it to spread like wild fire. I love what it represents – he and his team started a trend that is spreading rapidly – smallmouth bass are a sexy species to chase on the fly. He and his team pursued the premier native game fish in his area on the fly and showed everyone how awesome it could be.

I’m sure other guys were doing it in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, and New York but not in a big way until he paved that path. These days there are numerous guides and outfitters popping up around the Great Lakes that focus on smallmouth bass and/or adding them to their guiding portfolio. The smalljaw syndicate is growing and people are taking notice. Gorgeous specimens are popping up all over the region and people are starting to travel to the region to get a chance at a native trophy.

Here in Buffalo Niagara

There has always been a small and loyal group of fly anglers that can’t wait for smallies to leave the depths of Lake Erie and Lake Ontario and head to shallow waters where they become readily available to fly anglers (myself included). The key adjective is small. For generations now, conventional anglers from around the country have been visiting here to catch them but I don’t know of any fly angler from outside the region that’s done it. I’m sure they are out there – but don’t know them and it’s certainly NOT common. Why?

 

I’m not saying this is the best place to fish for smallmouth bass on the fly. I’ve fished for smallmouth bass on the fly in every Great Lakes bordering state (except for Indiana – it’s on the to do list) and many more down south and all of them have their own appeal. None of these places – except for Lake St Clair – produces the numbers and size of the fish available to fly anglers than Buffalo Niagara.

Aside from numbers and size, the key distinguishing factor in the Buffalo Niagara region is real estate. Pound for pound, smallmouth are among the hardest fighting fish out there. When they have very deep water and a ton of space to battle you, an angler with a 9-foot fly rod is in for a real treat. You get everything they have to offer and that’s a ton. They don’t quit – even when you lip them for the hero shot/release. They double over 8wts easily and every fish wears you out.

The Next Fly Fishing World Record Smallmouth Bass

After boating numerous 6+lb bass on the fly over the past few weeks, it got me curious. What’s the world record for smallmouth bass on the fly? Here’s the link. I’m not saying this to be cocky in any way – but my clients and I beat all of those records a few times over the past few weeks without realizing it. That’s our next project – setting that record. I’m not a record chaser by any means but if that’s what I have to do to draw fly anglers to the area – I’m up for it and I challenge all my regional brother and sister smalljaw fanatics to do the same.

I’m not a complicated dude. I don’t have a chip on my shoulder and I’m not the kind of person to stir up drama and talk trash. I AM a humble veteran that’s passionate about his fishery/region and equally passionate about it’s native species. I think any venturing angler that wants to pursue big, beautiful fish on the fly should add smallmouth bass to their to-do list and make Buffalo Niagara a stop on your tour of the smalljaw syndicate.

Spring Fishing is in Full Swing – 20180513 – 20180519

Spring fishing is on fire right now. Since our last report, we’ve been on the water every day. Every outing has been incredible and it will continue to be this way for the foreseeable future. All tackle types have been productive. Regardless of conditions, clear skies, dense fog, east/north wind, etc. – nothing slowed the bite down. This time of year is my favorite. I’ll let the pictures tell it.

Plan for Next Week – 20180520 – 20180526

More of the same. The wx forecast looks awesome – we’ll continue to fish for jaws for as long as we can. If you want to give it a shot – give us a call!

Happy Mothers Day – Show Some Love to the Moms in Your Life

Happy Mothers Day, Mom!

Mothers Day – I’m usually not a fan of contrived holidays but I am a fan of celebrating this one. If it wasn’t for my mother and my beautiful wife I wouldn’t be where I am today – a happy father doing what I love. My only hope is that reading this take the opportunity to reflect on what the mothers in our life have given to us to get us where we are today.

My mother (and father) raised a fire team of 3 boys. She was outnumbered 4:1 dudes to her and made her influence felt nonetheless. It had to be daunting but she did it the best way possible. She let us roam, explore, break ourselves (and each other), and learn by trial and error – the right way in my opinion. She was always there to encourage us and fix us when we were broken (emotionally and physically) and she continues to do so today.

That selflessness opened the door for my passion for the outdoors. Allowing us to wander off to fish or explore the woods for hours on end cemented what came to be the most important attribute to what I wanted in life – a loving wife and a life outdoors. I got just that. Happy Mothers Day mom – I love you!

The Other Mother in My Life

My beautiful and supportive wife, Janice, is the other mother in my life. She does an incredible job raising my daughter – providing her everything I can’t. She’s emotional, caring, loving, and just crazy enough to show our daughter you have to be a little off upstairs to marry/remain married to a fishing guide. We’re an awesome team and I couldn’t live my dream life without her. Thank you, my love – happy Mothers Day.

Please Reflect

As a father of a daughter, I’ve gotten more in touch with my emotions that I would admit around a campfire drinking beers with my bros. Those mothers in my life helped nurture that in me. If you’re a guide or outdoors enthusiast, and you’re married or still young enough that you live at home with your parents, take a moment to reflect on how the mothers in your life have helped you get to where you are now and where you want to go.

Observations from the Water (20180506 – 20180512)

It was a rollercoaster of a week. Those warm temps we wrote about last week stuck around for the first few days and we had some incredible days on the water. Dozens of jaws eating tubes, flies, and stickbaits. One day, the average fish was 5lbs with 2 over 6lbs – insane. Then the north and east winds hit and made things tough. We still got on them but it wasn’t gangbusters like early in the week. It seemed like they responded better to stick baits – but that could’ve been random.

Admittedly, I went a little internal for a couple days. I was hoping I wouldn’t have to wear my bib again until fall but froze my ass off for a couple days. Not cool – rather too cool.

Plan for Next Week (20180513 – 20180519)

I’m hoping the rain in the forecast actually happens this time. The tribs are low and clear. They are full of fish but many are getting on nests and we don’t fish for them when they are spawning. For one – the fight sucks and they don’t really eat. Also, it’s just dirty – they are easy targets and are just trying to raise their young. Let them be.

If the rain happens, we’ll likely spend some time on the tribs just to stretch out the legs a bit. That kinda hard to do considering the harbor and river are fishing extremely well right now – but it’s a lot of fun to throw flies in shallow water to fish that willingly slam streamers.

Give us a call if you want to get out! If you need a video to show you what your in for, check out our YouTube Channel.  Tight lines!

The Fishing Workout – Plus Observations from the Water – 20180408 – 20180414

People normally don’t put physical fitness and fishing together in the same sentence. I mean, why would you? For most, fishing is a way to escape the weekly grind and leave the toils of life behind. Considering it a workout may taint the experience for some. However, think about every guide you’ve ever known. How many are fat? I’m betting not many. You don’t often see fat/out of shape guides. In fact, staying in shape is very important in our profession to ensure focus and efficacy during long days on the water.

Where Did All This Fitness and Fishing Talk Come From?

I turn 40 this year. That age is less significant today that it was a few decades ago because people are living well into their nineties these days. However, it is still a benchmark for some/bears some sort of significance on people’s adult life. Like New Years, it offers an opportunity to set goals, reflect on what you’ve accomplished in life thus far, and look forward to what’s in store for the future.

My personal goal is to get into the best shape of my life before my 40th birthday (30-June). Really, the goal is to look the best I’ve ever looked. Considering I’ve been a paid athlete for all of my adult life (i.e. your tax dollars paid for me to be in elite physical condition while on active duty), I don’t have to do anything too transformative to hit this goal. However, a few tweaks are necessary for me to hit the mark and I have to consider the fact that I need to be able to guide at the same time.

Last Sunday, I injured my back at the gym during a workout I’ve done dozens of times. The injury wasn’t anything crazy. However, it hurt enough to leave me bed ridden and off the water for a day or two. When I was laying around wallowing in self-pity, I couldn’t help but consider, “What if I REALLY hurt myself?” In this line of work, if you can’t move, you can’t fish/guide. If I can’t fish/guide, I can’t feed my family. So what should I be doing in the gym to keep me in shape, allow me to hit my goal, and avoid injury? I have a few ideas.

Guides Are Generally in Shape For a Few Reasons

Back to reflecting on all the guides you know. Again, few are fat/out of shape and there are a few reasons for this:

– We’re always on our feet or on the move. Especially if you’re a guide that runs a walk and wade or rowing program. The other day, a buddy of mine told me he had been tracking our steps on his iPhone. We walked nearly 5 miles. It’s kind of tough to get out of shape when you’re logging that kind of activity on a regular basis.

– Being on the go means we often miss meals. In the dieting/fitness world, they call this “intermittent fasting.” There are a ton of studies out there that show a 16+ hour gap between meals has numerous health benefits. From weight loss, ability to burn fat, and control insulin levels. I’m not a dietician nor am I a scientist – I’m just providing commentary on what I’ve read.

– We’re outside, enduring all kinds of conditions. Fishing in the cold, rain, and snow, taxes our bodies to maintain warmth. It takes a lot calories to make that happen.

Ideally, a fitness routine that optimizes performance on the water should be low impact but extremely taxing. The program should be something we can do in less than an hour (30 mins is optimal) so we can squeeze it in when we get off the water. Such a program should also be easy to do at home – in the basement or garage – thereby saving gym costs and drive time back and forth.

The Workout

I will propose a few exercises but the exercises aren’t important. You can replace any of these with exercises you enjoy. The main idea is that every workout should be simple, quick, tax the entire body, and leave you exhausted once complete. You can do any of these workouts as many times per week as you want. Some weeks I workout every day. Some week’s I can only squeeze a couple workouts into the schedule. Bottom line, I make time.

Workout 1: Medicine Ball Slam Insanity

The Routine: Do as many as possible in one minute and then rest for 3 minutes. For that working minute, you need to get yourself to the point that you believe your heart will explode. Some element of fear, excitement, and adrenaline should creep up. You need to be completely smoked – so much so that you’ll need the 3 minutes of rest. Do this 8 times – so that’ll take you no more than 32 mins. That’s it.

The Logic: picking something up off the ground that has an awkward shape, lifting it over your head, and slamming it down as hard as you can works every muscle in your body. It’s also a movement you’ll likely repeat throughout the day when on the water. Well, not the slamming portion but hopefully you’ll end up bending over to net fish numerous times throughout the day and doing ball slams will ensure that’s never a problem.

Workout 2: Uphill Sprints

The Routine: Run as fast as you can on the steepest incline you can for a minute then rest 3 minutes. Tax yourself the same way as prescribed in the medicine ball slam.

The Logic: walk and wade guides in particular would benefit greatly from this kind of workout. The incline reduces impact on your joints while taxing the hell out of your legs, heart, and lungs. This will build leg and core strength that will help you last longer when on the water.

Workout 3: Burpee Box Jumps

The Routine: do a burpee next to a 2 foot box. When you complete the burpee, jump up on the box. Then drop down and go straight into another burpee. Do 10 of these in a row and take a minute rest. Do this 10 times.

The Logic: This is probably the most taxing exercise I’ve ever done. It works every muscle in your body. It also reinforces your connective tissue thereby allowing you to walk farther and stay on your feet longer.

Workout 4: As Many Rounds as Possible (AMRAP) in 20 minutes

The Routine: 5 pullups, 10 pushups, 15 squats (no weight). Do this sequence of exercises as many times as possible in 20 minutes.

The Logic: this workout hits every muscle in your body and keeps you moderately stressed for 20 minutes. Think of it as something that would help you if you had to carry a client or fishing buddy that got injured or if you needed to run to get help.

Parting Shots about the Workouts

All 4 workouts are simple, extremely taxing, and short. You can also substitute any number of exercises in place of what I recommended. For example, substitute kettlebell swings for ball slams. Use a YETI cooler instead of a box (thanks Willey). Jump rope fast instead of sprinting uphill. Your options are limitless. Just get the sessions in.

The Diet

This is perhaps more important than the workouts. My diet is EXTREMELY simple. Some would say it’s extreme in general. Bottom line, all I eat are animals. Eggs, fish, beef, venison, waterfowl, chicken, turkey, pork, bacon, whatever. If it was alive and had blood coursing through it’s veins at some point, it’s fair game. I started this by default when I was in Guyana and have kept it up since I returned. The results have been amazing.

I completely understand many who read this will think this kind of diet is either boring, or insane. Google the carnivore diet and read up. It’s not for everyone but it has worked amazingly for me. If you just can’t make yourself eat like this – do your best to eat whole foods. Nuts, veggies, meat, and a little fruit. Keep it simple. Eat only when hungry (don’t make yourself eat 3 meals per day). If you’re only hungry once, eat once.

Final Thoughts

Back to what got me thinking about all of this – the back injury. I hurt my back doing heavy deadlifts. Why was I dong heavy deadlifts? Pride and testosterone – it’s as simple as that. I shouldn’t have been doing them. They are useless for someone in my line of work. That kind of workout won’t help me hit my goal. Deadlifts are also high risk if not executed properly. I’ve been doing them for years but when you are far along in a session, sometimes laziness kicks in, your form suffers, and an injury happens. Never again.

Keep a log and try to outperform what you did on the previous workout. Listen to your body. Use the mirror and how you feel as your guide. Put some of these principles in place and I assure you that you’ll see awesome gains and will perform better when you’re on the water.

Observations from Last Week on the Water- 20180408 – 20180414

The back injury kept me of the water for much of the week but I managed to get in some water time and net a few fish. The tribs (all except Canadaway for some reason) got low and clear toward the end of the week. They all produced fish but angling get more difficult as the waters cleared up. We managed to hit the lower river for a quick outing before the sleet and wind hit. We did well.

Plan for this week – 20180415 – 20180421

We’ll be on the big water Monday through Wednesday. From Thursday through next Monday, we’ll be in Washington State trying to chalk up yet another region. Stay tuned and give us a call if you want to experience this first hand instead of reading about it.  You can also check out a video version of what we don on the water by clicking here.

Reconnaissance – the Cure for Slow Fishing

Reconnaissance – the Cure for Slow Fishing and Getting in Touch with your Fishery

“Just drive down that road, until you get blown up,” – General George Patton, about the role for reconnaissance troops
“Time spent in reconnaissance is seldom wasted,” – John Marsden

Viewed through the lens of modern warfighters, General Patton’s methods for reconnaissance were extremely crude.  Although a bit simplistic, he makes a valuable point for anglers who often get comfortable in routine. I have to check myself daily from going to that reliable water I know will catch fish. A recent reconnaissance mission put us in touch with something we believe worthwhile to explore. “Just driving down that road” taps into something primordial that we anglers cannot experience from working our reliable haunts – the excitement of fumbling into the unknown.

Although this started philosophical, that’s not the direction this essay will follow. We want to give our fellow anglers a methodology for “fumbling into the unknown.” Before starting down that road, we’ll drop one last plug as a quick aside to set the stage this “how to” piece. Over the past few weeks, conditions in Buffalo Niagara have been less than ideal. Cold, wind, bright skies, no precipitation (low water in some of the tribs) have been the bane of our fishing life lately. Sure, we’ve caught fish everywhere we went but it has definitely been a grind. So much so that we felt compelled to give fishing a rest and recon some new water we can fish when it warms up.

When was the last time you set out on a reconnaissance mission? Across the country, winters often carry a stigma for being tough. As this trying period is now ending, many anglers (us included) start getting excited for the more reliable spring fishing season. In western NY, that means steelhead, lake trout, and smallmouth bass. If you are just waiting for ideal conditions and relying on what you did last year – guess what – so is everyone else! That means that the same crowds/dense concentrations of anglers you experienced last year will be in play this year. How can you avoid this problem (around here it is definitely a problem – fistfights break out on some stretches of water)? If you don’t know how to begin, here are a few simple rules to get you started.

Nick and Nate capitalized on a solid recon session in PA this past week
Find the breadcrumb trail

Though, our favorite water to recon is the scarcely or totally unknown, forgotten, or otherwise underutilized fisheries – many bodies of water that you want to explore may be brand new to you but old hat for someone else. Take advantage and find the little nuggets lying around on the internet (while understanding that not all of it may be reliable). Use your favorite search engine with general terms of what your looking for and start following the trail. Use the collective knowledge that is already out there to build upon and take it to the next level.

Wait for it; this is going to be earth shattering, BUY A MAP!

Whether you are just getting into fishing or have been an avid angler for years, if your vehicle does not have some sort of detailed map/atlas/gazetteer, buy one ASAP and study it. There is some potential in every blue line and dot. We use Delorme Atlas and Gazetteers for every state we fish. Canada has a similar product for all their provinces. You’d be amazed at how many blue lines and dots as well as state/national lands are within reach. It can be daunting and generate some anxiety.

Formulate a plan

As a former United States Marine, this was my specialty. For anglers that have “normal” jobs and only have time to fish/conduct reconnaissance on the weekends or holidays, TIME is your most precious resource. Developing a plan will ensure the most effective use of your time. Once you have a map, plan your route carefully, looking for the best roads to take you to potential access points. There are a couple sub-rules here as well.

In the Marine Corps (and I’m sure this is in the corporate world’s lexicon as well) we have a saying, “eat the elephant one bite at a time.” That Atlas we mentioned in rule 1 contains a lot of information. As you start out reconnoitering an area, cut it up into manageable pieces and explore one piece at a time. Before long, you will thoroughly cover a large portion of your area.

Bring a supply of food and water with you to avoid making stops – besides, if you are venturing off the grid, there may be nowhere to eat. Lack of food and water will cause an early culmination on your mission or may serve to suck the confidence out of you.

Get familiar with Google Earth

This program is an invaluable tool for doing preliminary, off-water reconnaissance. The software allows you to explore satellite imagery of any given body of water. Though it may not be as useful for small mountain blue line streams, it is a key tool to have in your bag for larger bodies of water like lakes, ponds and rivers. Take advantage of the historical imagery to see what a given piece of water looks like in the low flows of summer or high flows of springtime run-off.

For lakes and larger rivers, you can even identify structure like weed beds, flats, deep water and rocks to help formulate your on-the-water plan of attack. If floating rivers is your game, you can map out a float and even measure the number of river miles to ensure you don’t find yourself looking for the pull-out long after dark while wondering if you somehow missed it.

Do not bring fishing equipment with you

We put this rule out there with some reservation but remember the point of the mission: to gain information that you can use for a future outing. Your purpose is not to fish. I know, that sounds crazy, especially if you end up recon’ing some new water and see fish just begging to be caught.  That’s understandable but remember the intangibles of fishing – embrace the excitement of discovering something new and develop a plan to go back.

Some may think not bringing gear is crazy so here is a compromise.  If you must bring a rod with you, don’t get caught up growing roots in one spot. Keep moving and cover ground.  Recon is about seeing a large enough slice of water that will allow you can form some broader conclusions and decide whether further, in-depth exploration is warranted.

Consider the environmental conditions

This rule is perhaps most important during summer recon missions. When you look at the water, consider what’s been happening with the weather lately. Is it low or boney? Maybe that’s because it hasn’t rained in weeks and that should trigger you to look for areas with deep pools where fish will likely hold until the water levels rise. Is the water raging and looking like chocolate milk? Well, that’s probably because it rained recently…or is it? In that situation, you at least know that the body of water is part of a viable drainage. If you visit a pond or lake, is the shoreline encroached with weeds? That’s probably because water temps are up and long periods of light are allowing the aquatic plants to grow. Try to picture this body of water in the late fall or spring.

Visit the tax assessor for the area

This may seem somewhat outdated as there are some apps that can do something similar.  However, tax assessors have maps that show what land is public and what land is private. Tax assessors are also locals to that area. Developing rapport with them may connect you you to a slice of angling heaven you didn’t know was there.

Conclusion

Getting out there is the best part of fishing – at least it is for us. If you fish often enough, you know there are days you just can’t buy a bite. Recon’ing is another way of getting out there. In the best of circumstances, you’ll find water you can call your own for a bit.  Worst case, you’ll find an area devoid of life but will have a better knowledge of the area. What do you have to lose…really?

Results of Last Week’s Time on the Water (20180319 – 20180325)

As we alluded to in last week’s blog, personal commitments kept us off the water for much of last week. We did get some water time in but it was a struggle. North winds, east winds, cold, low water in the tribs, etc. challenged us daily. We spent a HUGE amount of time on reconnaissance missions in preparation for the next 2 weeks.

Tony “The Zone” Lohr of 85th Day Angling continues to enjoy his winter vacations here in Buffalo Niagara

On the Docket for this week (20180326 – 20180401)

The weather looks good. The wind looks a bit dicey on a couple days but nothing too problematic. Temperatures will be in the upper 40s and low 50s! Finally, after about 5 months, we can fish without a beanie or gloves. It’s gonna feel weird. There is a good amount of precipitation in the forecast as well. That’s awesome because we need it. As we wait for that rain to fall, we’ll be spending all our time on the big water – picking away at fresh and drop back steel and lake trout. Give us a call if you want to get out there!

Complacency Kills Angling Prospects

Does Complacency Kill in Angling?

Back in my military days, Complacency Kills, was a phrase embedded in our heads starting in basic training. The theory behind the idea is that if you become complacent, you lose situational awareness.  If you lose situational awareness, you could end up getting yourself and your fellow warriors killed. Yeah, that’s a bit extreme if you try to directly apply that example to what you do on the water – but maybe not.

I could site numerous examples how complacency could kill you (or injure you severely) if you don’t pay attention to what’s going on when you are on your boat in the middle of winter with ice cold water flowing by at 225,000 cubic feet per second. However, that’s a different blog for a different time. Complacency could kill your chances of catching fish if you end up lulled into the rhythm of flowing downstream on the same drift repeatedly, watching your float/bobber/indicator, using the same bait/lure/fly.

Taking a Different Angle

Situation: You pull up to a small tributary to one of the Great Lakes with the intent of fishing a spot you’re confident will produce. After getting set up and making a few casts, you hook up, reinforcing your confidence that there are a ton of fish in that spot. Do you:

1. Move on to another pool or location in search of more
2. Catch a couple more from that spot if you can and THEN move on to another spot
3. Stay in that spot all day and catch as many fish as possible as long as the action permits

I’m willing to bet that most people would choose (3). Is that complacency? Well…yes, it is. Is that a problem? That all depends on your perspective. If you don’t fish that often and you just want to feel the tug, I’d say it’s not a big problem. If you fish often AND you remain in the same spot and keep catching, I’d ask you to think about what that pool around the bend might be holding. After all, didn’t you just catch a few fish? How many do you REALLY need to land to feel satisfied? Don’t answer that aloud – you’ll likely learn something about yourself you didn’t want to know.

Guiding Considerations

If you’re a guide and are fishing with clients, the answer to this question is A LOT more nuanced – well, it is for me. Maybe it’s a good call to stay to keep your clients happy – nothing breeds happiness on a fishing trip more than catching fish, right? The problem with staying is that you may beat up that pool and ruin your chances of catching fish there the following day with a different set of clients. Another problem with staying is that your entire day will be spent in one spot and nothing breeds complacency more than remaining stationary. Yet another issue with staying and slaying is that you leave your clients with the impression that this little slice of water your on is the only thing around worth fishing.

Making it Personal

Everyone who knows me well will tell you that I’m decisive – to a fault. I like to move. Exploration is key. Wondering what’s going on around the bend is always on my mind.  Changing things up just to see if it works is always at play.  Personally, on my own time, I would chose option (1) from above – no question. If I catch a fish from a spot, I may make a few more casts but if I don’t catch something soon thereafter, I move or change things up. With clients, I roll with option (2) as it’s a healthy compromise to keep me sane and to keep my clients happy.

On my own time, I nearly ALWAYS leave fish to find fish and I’m not bothered if by doing so results in me not catching another fish for the rest of the day. If I end up skunking at the follow on spots, at least I learned where the fish are and where they aren’t. However, more times than not, moving on results in catching more fish in more locations and keeps me sharp while doing so. Complacency doesn’t even emerge as a potential problem. Could I have caught more fish if I just stayed put? Maybe…maybe not. I’ll never know and that doesn’t bother me. Who am I kidding?!? It bothers the hell out of me, it’s one of the things that fuel my continued interest in angling, and I hope it will continue to do so for the rest of my life.

Conclusion

It is not the intent of this little “think piece” to provide the reader with a recommendation for how to fish. There are plenty of instructional articles out there that do an awesome job teaching anglers about what to do in these kinds of situations. There are a dearth of articles that ask the reader to think about what they would do and why. It’s my hope this article accomplished that end. There is no WRONG answer to the question above. However, complacency may end up playing into your decision when you are on the water – especially when it’s cold, you can’t feel your fingers, and it just started snowing. Try not to let it.

Fishing Report from last week (20180312-20180318)

What a week! Lots of fish. We fished a lot of water and all of it produced. Although the week started off slow, from Tuesday onward, we saw awesome action. I’ll let the pictures tell it. We caught fish on every tackle type and all produced well. Water levels on the Great Lakes tributaries were excellent as were the numbers of fish present. The big water was clear as well and full of willing fish. The only thing that wasn’t optimal was the weather. Cold, warm, frigid, snowing, melting, blowing – this seems like a never-ending winter in Buffalo Niagara. The only thing keeping me sane these days is how awesome the fishing has been through all of it.

*we got lucky and caught a few pike – purely on accident.  The lucky part was that this happened the day before pike season in this part of the state closed the following day.  If you see them, leave them alone to spawn.

On the Docket for Next Week (20180319 – 20180325)

Personal commitments this week will keep us off the water for a couple days. That’s somewhat a good thing in that this ridiculous, frigid weather is going to continue. Highs won’t break freezing for much of the week and winds from the north will make those cold temps feel even colder. We’ll hit the big water at least a couple days but will likely spend most of our time walking the tribs. Many of them will be low and clear, which means we’ll have to go into stealth mode with lighter leaders and sparse baits/lures/flies. We’re up for the challenge. Are you? Give us a call if you want to find out!

Late Winter Fishing Report – 20180305-20180311

Late Winter Fishing Report – 20180305-20180311

Late winter in Buffalo Niagara often feels like, well, winter. Just like it did this past week. The temperatures were below freezing, the wind blew from just about every direction week, and it snowed – white outs at times. That may sound dreary to some – to most people probably. From casual small talk at the gas station to random conversations with friends and acquaintances, people think it’s insane that charters continue throughout the winter. I’m shocked that they’re shocked.

#noshacknastiesaroundhere

Too many people go into a quasi-hibernation mode around here during the winter. Lately, I’ve been questioning the sanity of the population around me when I think about the how many people in the Buffalo Niagara region have been cooped up inside for the past few months. Granted, fishing may not be for everyone (doubtful) but people still need a passion, interest, hobby, or SOMETHING that gets them outside long enough to absorb some fresh air and sunlight for their mental and physical health. For the hundredth time –WINTER FISHING IS AN AWESOME OPTION if you don’t have that THING to get you out outside.

What Gets You Outside in Late Winter?

Our clients and friends over this past week represented a variety of demographics – from people with “secure” careers, to small business owners, to teenagers. Some had fishing experience. Others had very little time on the water under their belt. Prior to stepping foot on the boat, all of them shared the belief that fishing in frigid temperatures is probably a bit nuts. Thankfully, morbid curiosity and a bit of late winter caginess prompted them to give us a call. We’re glad they were daring enough to challenge the mindset that hibernation is the only way to endure a Buffalo Niagara winter.

To some extent, I’m sure the perceived insanity of late winter fishing continued to flow their minds as we motored up through the rapids on the Lower River, dodging the occasional small chunk of ice. That mindset may have continued as they tried to absorb the grandeur of the Lower Niagara River canyon. However, the idea of late winter fishing became COMPLETELY sane when they got that first hookup on a big fish. Suddenly, staying out there and continuing to fish for huge lake run fish became the only sane thing to do.

Notes from Last Week

Fishing was WAY MORE feast than famine compared to the week prior. Sure, as often happens in fishing, there is a slow few hours or maybe a slow day in the mix but we had excellent action all week. We fished a variety of water – from the bar to the Niagara River, to the Great Lakes tribs – and did very well on all of it. The water was, and continues to be, extremely cold but something prompted the fish into feed mode and we took advantage of it. I’ll let the pictures tell it.

 

     

On the Docket for this Week

Believe it or not – and this is probably a bit crazy – I experienced a little anxiety when daylight savings hit because it let me know spring is getting close. Weeks like last week leave me wanting winter to endure a bit longer so we can continue to catch steelhead, lake trout, and brown trout with relative ease. This week, the weather looks promising to make me feel like winter is sticking around for a bit. Temperatures will remain low but so will the amount of precipitation. We’re hoping that leads to more of the same kind of fishing we experienced this past week. We’ll be out there almost every day so we’ll find out soon enough.

 

For the Sake of Buffalo Niagara Mental Health

Help your fellow western New Yorkers by shedding the shack nasties. Your friends, colleagues from work, and most importantly – your family, will thank you for it. We have some ideas about things to do here in late winter. Give us a call. For those that decide to remain cooped up – the first day of spring is coming quick. I’m keeping my fingers crossed that it doesn’t come too quick.

The Dog Days of Winter – is That a Thing?

Are the dog days of winter a thing?

I was out fishing on the Lower Niagara River with Chuck and his bride Sara a few days ago when the concept of the “dog days of winter” popped up. Not even a week earlier, he and I both had strong days in the same spot using the same tactics. That day, however, action was sporadic. Not so slow as to make us lose interest but slow enough for us to start considering if the “dog days of winter” was a real thing. This short but interesting conversation got me wondering if there was anything I could do to prevent or minimize prolonged patterns of slow activity. I haven’t landed on a firm position on this idea yet, but I did determine that a look at myself would be a great place to start.

Dog Days or Not, a Nice Steelhead Always Brings a Smile to your Face.
Do Fish Experience the Same Lulls We Do?

Back to the day Chuck, Sara, and I were on the Lower Niagara River. If you’ve never fished this place before, click here to see what it’s like. This time of year, we fish the Lower Niagara River for steelhead and lake trout. The steelhead are there staging for the spawn and the lake trout are there recovering from the spawn and getting full on steelhead eggs and bait. Bottom line – there are many fish around – the challenge is determining what they want to eat. We tried every presentation and every lure/bait we had in the box and could only just pick away at them. What’s up with that? Why did they turn off so quickly? They are all still down there – we can see them on the sonar so why the hell aren’t they
biting?

Sara with a Nice Winter Laker
Dog Days Defined

This lull is what we labeled as the dog days of winter. I don’t typically use the phrase, “dog days,” to describe anything. However, I’m guilty of empathizing with people when they talk about the dog days of summer. The images that pop into my head when I think about the dog days of summer are a bunch of sweaty bodies hanging out on their porches, drinking something cold, just hanging in there. Sluggish. Lazy. I think (read as I’m hoping) that fish behave the same way when they find themselves in the middle of a stable weather pattern and a lot of heat.

So what images pop into the dome when contemplating the idea of the dog days of winter? I conjured a few. If you’re not from the Buffalo Niagara Region or really any of the Great Lakes bordering states, you’ll likely feel sorry for us:
– A slumped over figure
– More than a few pounds heavier than 6 months ago
– Very little skin exposed/likely wearing a hoodie and sweatpants
– The skin that is exposed is pasty
– Mindless gaze on the face caused by binge watching shows on Netflix/Amazon Prime

Mindfulness is the Key to Breaking the Cycle

I want to believe the fish are in the same situation in the middle of winter. Many of them have been in the Lower River for a few months now. They’ve seen all matter of tackle and debris flow by them. They’ve seen more than a few of their compatriots move to grab what they thought was food only to be violently pulled away in a flurry of chaos. I think it’s safe to say they are in a bit of a rut. Maybe I’m humanizing them too much (I probably am). Maybe I’m not. Bottom line, I have to assume this is the case and do everything I can to prove otherwise.

Picking away at the Tribs for Steel
Picking away at the Tribs for Steel – look at that Water Color in the Background

Proving otherwise involves a lot of thinking and physical activity. You have to change speeds, angles, tackle, bait, drifts, etc. – and hope you figure out a pattern. Your eyes have to capture and your mind has to absorb all the little details. Your hands will likely be cold but you can’t let that prevent you from changing lures or bait. You’ll likely be freezing but you can’t let that affect your situational awareness. Remaining mindful throughout the struggle is the best way to stay engaged and your best shot of figuring out a pattern.

Final Thoughts

As charter captains and guides, we spend a lot of time on the water and all of us experience slow periods in fishing. Sometimes it’s only part of the day. Sometimes it can last a couple days. For the most part however, we catch fish regularly (we’d better – it’s our job). That’s not to say it’s easy, just that we spend a lot of time doing this so we can get things dialed in a bit faster than the average angler.

When we find ourselves in a slow period, all we can do is a better job of taking notice of what’s going on and experiment with ways to combat the lull. Most of the time we’re successful. Sometimes we aren’t. Those hard periods are the gems – the learning opportunities – OR they are just a message from Mother Nature reminding you that there is a warm couch back home and that you’d be better off going there than floating down a river in the cold. My mother would tell you that listening to what she said was never a strong suit of mine.

Notes on Recent Fishing Activity

Dog days of winter or not, we’ve been on the water.  Yeah, it was a bit slow toward the end of this past week.  All that rain and high temperatures melted every bit of snow and completely saturated the ground and our regional, Great Lakes tributaries.  Just about everything was blown out over the weekend but we hung in there, tried a bunch of techniques and flies, and managed to land some fish.

Although the tributaries were a bit problematic due to high water, the Niagara River didn’t have that problem.  Devils Hole is still running clear and fishing well for this time of year.  Below the power authority, all the mud from Cayuga Creek, the Erie Canal, and Buffalo Creek caused by the rain and snow melt is clouding up the water quite a bit.  The upper Niagara River, although clear, is full of icebergs now as yesterday’s gale force winds blew them downstream from Lake Erie.  We won’t head back out on the Upper until that stuff clears out.

Josh – just happy to be out there.
Josh – this was the first time he had ever gone fishing and he managed to land a steelhead on a fly rod. Nice work, Josh!
Ruben – having a blast. This was his first time fishing – EVER. He hooked 3 steelhead – all of which broke him off (and bewildered the hell out of him). We’re glad he had fun.
Mark – intensely trying to figure this fly fishing thing out.
A Bro Vacation on the Water – Mark, Josh, and Ruben visiting WNY from Cleveland. They planned on going skiing – Mother Nature had different plans
Notes on Upcoming Fishing

We are about to experience a very mild stretch of water.  The tribs will clear up quickly now that all the snow is gone so we plan on spending some time walking over the next few days.  The Lower River continues to fish well for steelhead and the sporadic lake trout so we’ll be spending time on the big water as well.  If you find yourself lookin for a cure to the dog days of winter – give us a call! 

Ready to Fish?

Book a Trip

[email protected]
1 (716) 704-5144

Contact Us